We introduced Veeam Explorer for Microsoft Active Directory — a very helpful utility when it comes to AD objects recovery — as a part of Veeam Backup & Replication v8. Its initial functionality was intended to solve the most frequent cases administrators have with Active Directory: Granular objects and containers recovery (ok, password recovery also was included, as well as AD data export in LDIFDE format). All of that made a lot of people happy, but, as always, they wanted more. The community gave us great feedback, asking for additional features for less frequent cases or specific scenarios. We found out that, besides the most frequent operations like adding and removing users/computers to the domain, sometimes they had to deal with more advanced restore operations related to Group Policy Objects (GPO), DNS-integrated records and so on. That said, we worked hard and added some new functionality to provide administrators with such options. And it's never been easier.
Best practices are guidelines you follow when deploying a system and want everything to work smoothly. But what about worst practices, those common mistakes and errors that inexperienced IT admin make when deploying or configuring a system? Here, I’ll discuss worst backup practices and how NOT to configure your virtual infrastructure’s backup solution with Veeam.
Modern enterprises know that disasters are a fact of life. They also understand that disasters come in many shapes and sizes and lead to varying degrees of Availability loss and impact on business continuity. Because major wide-scale disasters occur way less often than smaller disasters from within a data center, it’s also important to plan and test cloud disaster recovery models for smaller disasters that can happen at VM, guest OS or application levels. In this article we'll talk about the importance of planning and testing your DR strategy, as well as the categories of the cloud disaster recovery models.

Data centers have been around for a long time and are very important. Especially for me, as I sit here listening to Apple Music — which is streaming from an Apple data center. The backups, applications and widgets you use every day are all made possible because there is a data center somewhere that supports them. We have learned which processes and procedures work based on what does or doesn’t go well. We’re going to look at some different maintenance activities today, but we’ll also discuss data center outages to see what we can learn.

December 21, 2016

Migrating to the cloud

Posted by Eli Afanasyev

In this cloud blog series, we’ve talked about how secure backups can be in a cloud environment and what the cost may be of not leveraging the potential of DRaaS. The next step would be to start thinking about how to migrate your infrastructure or backups/replicas to the cloud and at what scale it has to be done. We will review the main points that you need to consider and check prior to initiating your move into the world of cloud.

There are only five months left until VeeamON 2017, and following the announcement of our keynote speakers Mark Russinovich, CTO, Microsoft Azure, and Sanjay Poonen, COO, Customer Operations, VMware, the good news keeps on coming with a way for you to access a FREE pass to the event. I am happy to share details with you on the Blog your way to VeeamON contest. I will also provide you with some useful tips designed to help you plan your trip to New Orleans between May 16 — 18, 2017, so keep reading.

Even though Veeam has made a name for itself with industry-leading, agentless backup solutions for virtualized environments, we are still constantly asked about backing up non-virtualized systems. Based on feedback and as a growth opportunity, we decided to launch Veeam Agent for Microsoft Windows (formerly known as Veeam Endpoint Backup FREE). Veeam Agent for Microsoft Windows will be available soon and it includes many top-requested features! We were also constantly asked about Linux systems, so we finally announced Veeam Agent for Linux and launched a beta.

Today, we are excited to announce that Veeam Agent for Linux is generally available!

It has been an extremely busy time for Veeam with the release of Veeam Availability Suite 9.5, the release of Veeam Backup for Microsoft Office 365 as well as the upcoming public beta of Veeam Agent for Microsoft Windows. This release trend is continuing and today I am pleased to announce the general availability (GA) of Veeam Management Pack (MP) for System Center Update 3 and its Availability for download!

icrosoft has a new Windows Server 2016 and Veeam has a new Veeam Availability Suite 9.5. The release dates of these two great products are too close to be a coincidence. In fact, I know that many of the features of Veeam Availability Suite 9.5 were built specifically for Windows Server 2016. Many of our competitors in the Availability marketplace will claim that they have “support” for Windows Server 2016, which in most cases just means that they can back up an instance of Windows Server 2016 if the conditions are right. At Veeam, we don’t just support Windows Server 2016.

At Veeam we innovate to deliver the best Availability solutions on the market and also innovate in the ways we have fun and celebrate. This year was an important milestone in our company’s history. At our tenth anniversary, Veeam reached the threshold of 200,000 customers and we celebrated in style. We rewarded our 200,000th customer, together with three lucky winners, in a noteworthy manner – a weightless flight.